Biomimicry News
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  About |  Newsletter |  Submit News |  Links |  Subscribe to BiomimicryNews.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Articles
Batteries included: A solar cell that stores its own powerBatteries included: A solar cell that stores its own power

Lift weights, improve your memoryLift weights, improve your memory

Beyond LEDs: Brighter, new energy-saving flat panel lights based on carbon nanotubesBeyond LEDs: Brighter, new energy-saving flat panel lights based on carbon nanotubes

Hubble project maps temperature, water vapor on wild exoplanetHubble project maps temperature, water vapor on wild exoplanet

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny waysMagnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnasticsCharged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics

A unique approach to monitoring groundwater supplies near Ohio fracking sitesA unique approach to monitoring groundwater supplies near Ohio fracking sites

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Spiders: Survival of the fittest groupSpiders: Survival of the fittest group

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agricultureBuilding a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Stunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreckStunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreck

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intoleranceGut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Snakes improve search-and-rescue robots (1/24/2012)

Tags:
robotics, snakes
Scalybot 2, built by Georgia Tech, is designed to be a a more efficient search-and-rescue robot. It was designed based on the movements of snakes. -  The Georgia Institute of Technology
Scalybot 2, built by Georgia Tech, is designed to be a a more efficient search-and-rescue robot. It was designed based on the movements of snakes. - The Georgia Institute of Technology

Designing an all-terrain robot for search-and-rescue missions is an arduous task for scientists. The machine must be flexible enough to move over uneven surfaces, yet not so big that it's restricted from tight spaces. It might also be required to climb slopes of varying inclines. Existing robots can do many of these things, but the majority require large amounts of energy and are prone to overheating. Georgia Tech researchers have designed a new machine by studying the locomotion of a certain type of flexible, efficient animal.

"By using their scales to control frictional properties, snakes are able to move large distances while exerting very little energy," said Hamid Marvi, a Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. candidate at Georgia Tech.

While studying and videotaping the movements of 20 different species at Zoo Atlanta, Marvi developed Scalybot 2, a robot that replicates rectilinear locomotion of snakes. He unveiled the robot this month at the Society for Integrative & Comparative Biology (SICB) annual meeting in Charleston, S.C.

"During rectilinear locomotion, a snake doesn't have to bend its body laterally to move," explained Marvi. "Snakes lift their ventral scales and pull themselves forward by sending a muscular traveling wave from head to tail. Rectilinear locomotion is very efficient and is especially useful for crawling within crevices, an invaluable benefit for search-and-rescue robots."

Scalybot 2 can automatically change the angle of its scales when it encounters different terrains and slopes. This adjustment allows the robot to either fight or generate friction. The two-link robot is controlled by a remote-controlled joystick and can move forward and backward using four motors.

"Snakes are highly maligned creatures," said Joe Mendelson, curator of herpetology at Zoo Atlanta. "I really like that Hamid's research is showing the public that snakes can help people."

Marvi's advisor is David Hu, an assistant professor in the Schools of Mechanical Engineering and Biology. Hu and his research team are primarily focused on animal locomotion. They've studied how dogs and other animals shake water off their bodies and how mosquitos fly through rainstorms.

This isn't the first time Hu's lab has looked at snake locomotion. Last summer the team developed Scalybot 1, a two-link climbing robot that replicates concertina locomotion. The push-and-pull, accordion-style movement features alternating scale activity.

By observing 20 different species of snakes, Georgia Tech has built a new search-and-rescue robot designed to use less energy. The project is overseen by David Hu, an assistant professor in the Schools of Mechanical Engineering and Biology, and Hamid Marvi, a Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. candidate. - The Georgia Institute of Technology

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the Georgia Institute of Technology

Post Comments:

Search
New Articles
Bioinspired coating for medical devices repels blood and bacteria

Bioinspired materials enable new health-care optionsBioinspired materials enable new health-care options

Shorebird's beak inspires research on water collectionShorebird's beak inspires research on water collection

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Artificial 'beaks' that collect water from fog: A drought solution?

'Squid skin' metamaterials project yields vivid color display

Pesky insect inspires practical technologyPesky insect inspires practical technology

A semi-artificial leaf faster than 'natural' photosynthesisA semi-artificial leaf faster than 'natural' photosynthesis

Engineering long-lasting joint lubrication by mimicking nature

Researchers inspired by marine life to design camouflage systems

Scientists discover the miracle of how geckos move, cling to ceilingsScientists discover the miracle of how geckos move, cling to ceilings

How spiders spin silk

Squid sucker ring teeth material could aid reconstructive surgery, serve as eco-packaging

Study of animal urination could lead to better-engineered productsStudy of animal urination could lead to better-engineered products

Carbon-fiber epoxy honeycombs mimic the material performance of balsa woodCarbon-fiber epoxy honeycombs mimic the material performance of balsa wood



Archives
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
October 2006


Science Friends
Agricultural Science
Astronomy News
Sports Tech
Biology News
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Cybernetics Research
Electonics Research
Forensics Report
Fossil News
Genetic Archaeology
Genetics News
Geology News
Microbiology Research
Nanotech News
Parenting News
Physics News


  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2015 Web Doodle, LLC. All rights reserved.